Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali

Alexandra Ghika, the director of Art & Culture a.k.a. Ltd, collaborates for sale of the sculptures from private Collection. This collection of sculptures perfectly illustrates Dali’s insatiable creative drive and his total mastery of passing from an object to an invention, a drawing, a painting or a sculpture. The collection for sale includes two angels – one surrealistic and the other cubist, an Otorhinological Head of Venus, a Zootrope Model, a Sculptural object called Sublime Moment, a Night Table and a Head of Beethoven. Each sculpture is the epitome of refinement in both its physical aspect and its iconographical meaning. The sculptures refer to the subjects and questions that fascinated Dali: science, mathematics, spirituality, dreams, the subconscious, surrealism, the ready-made, historical events, fetishism, objects, nature and the culture of his native Catalonia. The sculptures in the collection were done late in his life, since Dali began working with three dimensions in the 20’s and these works were done between the 60’s and the 80’s. The collection includes four other works The Night Table – weaning of furniture-food, Sublime Moment – Grand Ashtray, the Zootrope Model and Beethoven, referring to more earthly, nostalgic concerns of a quieter Dali. The Night Table: Dali used a fragment of a painting from 1934 . This sculpture is specifically a night table that haunted him since childhood and that he depicts repeatedly in various paintings throughout his life. For Dali, the emptiness in space left by the door symbolizes absence and missing someone dear to him. He explains this in a number of his writings and repeats the void in several of his pictorial works. In Sublime Moment, taken from the painting of the same name, Dali brings together dissimilar objects of daily life. In a magnificent arrangement using eggs, a sardine, a razor blade, a snail, a dish and a telephone, he tries to tell the unlikely story of a telephone conversation between the Allies and Hitler. This sculpture-object is the most surrealistic in the collection.

Salvador Dali

The name of the Zootrope Model comes from a Scarab show created by Dali in 1971. The model represents man of the future and his lifestyle as Dali imagines it. He is covered with strips in patterns reminiscent of stories for children: games, a monkey doing a back flip over a vase; someone riding a monocycle; a child blowing soap bubbles; a man hopping on a balloon; a frog in a red riding coat eating an insect; two children spinning on their feet. Beethoven’s Head, the last work in the collection, was initially a drawing in ink that Dali did in public in 1973, with his Catalan espadrilles. Then he wanted to do it in bronze, but he did not live to see the model cast. We don’t know exactly what is behind this spectacular Beethoven’s Head, no doubt a hazy souvenir from a faraway day of childhood when he and his musician friend Ricardo Pichot, watching the sky after a storm, saw the clouds form an enormous head of Beethoven. The collection of Dali sculptures is unique and, so far, has been very private. It is beautiful proof that three-dimensional work was not a hobby, or an occasional occupation for Dali, although most of his works were modeled in wax or plaster using his hands, and were only cast after he died, in keeping with his instructions

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